Anat: Chaos and Order may be together.

Daughter of El and sister and lover of Baal, Strength of Life, Anat the Destroyer  Lady of the Mountain, Adolescent Anat. She was a Canaanite Virgin Goddess of war and the hunt, she is also considered a “mistress of animals” (potnia thereon) with both predatory and protector aspects. She killed a seven-headed serpent. This event was celebrated on a feast, She decorate herself in rouge an henna and make a belt with the hand and heads of enemies. After she makes a ritual peace offering.

She was aggressive and angry, she took revenge on Aqhat who did not want to exchange a bow and arrows for immortality. Aqhat had an offensive answer:

“bows are for men!Do women ever hunt?”

Some state that Anat is not a typical fertility Goddess, she is not a mother of all gods as Ashera, even if she nurses them. Her role as hunter is certainly questioned by Aqhat as a female role. But she was certainly a lover and care for Baal. Like the heart of a cow for her calf, like the heart of a ewe for her lamb,so was Anat’s heart for Baal.”

This relationship between Baal and Anat is considered as representing the power of fertility over death and chaos. The female quality of bringer of life is completed with the male part Baal to defeat death. So Anat appeared a dual Goddess, she brings life and death, order and chaos. This idea of death defeated by fertility will revive many years later in classical Greek myth. But the integration between chaos and order will not be usual in the future.

Bib.

Thomas Hentrich, The Fertility Pair Baal and Anat in the Ugaritic Texts

http://georgebrown.academia.edu/ThomasHentrich/Papers/471372/The_Fertility_Pair_Baal_and_Anat_in_the_Ugaritic_Texts

Goddess Anat Warrior Virgin of the Ancient Levant

http://matrifocus.com/SAM03/spotlight.htm

http://www.pantheon.org/articles/a/anat.html

Canaanite/Ugaritic Mythology FAQ, ver. 1.2by Christopher B. Siren

http://home.comcast.net/~chris.s/canaanite-faq.html

ANAT: UGARIT’S “MISTRESS OF ANIMALS”. PEGGY L. DAY

http://www.jstor.org/pss/545543

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